Get notified whenever new sightings are posted via our Twitter account @NLNatureAlerts

Snowshoe Hare Links

Previous Sightings by Marcel Roy

Thumbnail ImageCommon Merganser on January 28, 2011
Thumbnail ImageAmerican Robin (Turdus migratorius) on June 29, 2010
Thumbnail ImageNorthern Pintail (Anas acuta) on November 17, 2010
Thumbnail ImageTufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) on March 19, 2011
Thumbnail ImageGreylag Goose (Anser anser) on December 05, 2010
Thumbnail ImageMute Swan (Cygnus olor) on November 16, 2010
Thumbnail ImageFox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) on October 08, 2010

Statistics

  • Viewed: 1457 times
  • Liked: 12 times

Do you like the sighting?

12 liked it
Contributors » Marcel Roy » Snowshoe Hare

Snowshoe Hare discovered by Marcel Roy (#558)

Powered By Subgurim(http://googlemaps.subgurim.net).Google Maps ASP.NET

Sighting Info

Observed: May 27, 2011 @ 6:00 PM
Posted on: May 28, 2011 @ 8:33 AM (diff: 1 days)
Comments:
Snowshoe Hare, Lepus americanus, introduced around 1860. It has the name "snowshoe" because of the large size of its hind feet and the marks its tail leaves. The animal's feet prevent it from sinking into the snow when it hops and walks. Its feet also have fur on the soles to protect it from freezing temperatures. For camouflage, its fur turns white during the winter and rusty brown during the summer. Its flanks are white year-round. The Snowshoe Hare is also distinguishable by the black tufts of fur on the edge of its ears. Its ears are shorter than those of most other hares. In summer, it feeds on plants such as, grass, ferns and leaves; in winter, it eats twigs, the bark from trees, and buds from flowers and plants and, along with the Arctic Hare, has been known to steal meat from baited traps. Hares are cannibalistic under availability of dead conspecifics, and have been known to eat dead rodents such as mice due to low availability of protein in an herbivorous diet. It is sometimes seen feeding in small groups. This animal is mainly active at night and does not hibernate. The Snowshoe Hare may have up to four litters in a year which average 3 to 8 young. Males compete for females and females may breed with several males.

Sighting's Identification

Help to Identify

Newfoundland Nature

Newfoundland Nature

Leave Your Comment

In order to leave a comment, you need to register. It is very fast and easy

Click here to login or register