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* Counts: sighings ~ comments & posts | Be here by posting your observations and commenting on other sightings

NLNature in Numbers

Members Sightings Sght. Comments Sght. Photos Sght. Likes Sght. Views
979 5,030 1,618 7,177 5,304 1,140,378

Welcome our newest member, tongypg (joined Saturday, April 18, 2015). Have you joined yet?!

Did you know our most liked sighting was observed on Friday, January 1, 2010 by The Coyote Kid. It is liked by 54 visitors!

And our most viewed sighting was observed on Wednesday, October 6, 2010 by sam. It was viewed 11463 times!

Most recent comments

0 days ago Melissa made the following comment on the observation of Canada Geese posted on April 07, 2015:
Oh, that's great! Thanks so much, Sam! (reply...)
1 days ago Cheryl made the following comment on the observation of Bird, Purple finch posted on May 14, 2014:
Thanks. (reply...)
1 days ago sam made the following comment on the observation of Canada Geese posted on April 07, 2015:
Good photo, Niko!!! Melissa, if you visit Clarenville, be sure to go to the Shoal Harbour causeway. you will no doubt see many Canada Geese. also to Little Heart's Ease on Route #204. many hundreds gather there to feed. Sam (reply...)
1 days ago sam made the following comment on the observation of Bird, Purple finch posted on May 14, 2014:
That is an excellent Photo. I can't remember when I saw one. (reply...)
1 days ago sam made the following comment on the observation of Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) posted on October 06, 2010:
THANKS, Scott, for the information. I visited the site you mentioned and realized that is one awful natural catastrophe. We don't need that epidemic here. Sam (reply...)
2 days ago Cheryl made the following comment on the observation of Bird, Sharp-shinned Hawk posted on February 14, 2015:
Thanks! (reply...)
2 days ago Scott and Ally made the following comment on the observation of Bird, Sharp-shinned Hawk posted on February 14, 2015:
Nice photo.
(reply...)
2 days ago Scott and Ally made the following comment on the observation of Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) posted on October 06, 2010:
So far WNS has not been found in NL. There are a number of people working on detecting this in NL. Contact your local wildlife office if you ever see a dead bat or bats flying in the winter. White nose is thought to have been first introduced to North America in a tourist cave in Albany New York. It is spread naturally by bats migrating and through human introduction. Not sure if the full details on all vectors of transport are known. WNS is an infectious fungus that negatively affects hibernating bats. Over six million bats have been killed by this fungus in eastern North America since 2006. Scott

https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/news/north-american-bat-death-toll-exceeds-55-million-white-nose-syndrome
(reply...)
2 days ago Scott and Ally made the following comment on the observation of American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) posted on April 19, 2015:
I could not get a better photo. It flew away as I tried to get closer.
(reply...)
2 days ago Cheryl made the following comment on the observation of Bird, Pine Grosbeak posted on October 25, 2014:
Thank you so much! (reply...)